A Little Self Brag

2021 is coming to a close, and that’s the time most people reflect on what they’ve accomplished over the last year and plan for the new one. And as I have been reflecting on this year, I have to say I feel like patting myself on the back a little.

I’ve published four new books in 2021 and they haven’t been doing too shabby. Especially over the last two months. I’m not raking in a bunch of money or anything, but I’ve sold at least one book every day for the last month. Compared to last year where I sold maybe one book a month, I can’t help but jump for joy at the improvement.

And next year, I plan to publish four more books. So I can only imagine what my sales will look like by this time next year. I feel a little giddy at the prospect of this really becoming my actual job.

But this leads me into a little rant that’s been nagging at my brain recently.

Last month, I received a message from someone in my home town asking me for advice about publishing for her boyfriend. I was totally honest about the process and where I’ve gained all my insights. I mentioned all the podcasts I listen to and the blogs I follow. She was grateful for the information and we had a nice little back and forth for a few days. Until she asked about the money. And again, I was honest. I make about $30 a month from my books right now. My highest month has been $50. And if you know nothing about indie publishing, that sounds terrible, right?

But if you have done research and looked at the process of self-publishing, you should know better. And that’s why I was supremely irritated when she left me on read after that message. We’d been talking about self-publishing as a business and I gave her the advice that I felt I was qualified to give. But because I’m not rich, I’m suddenly not worth her time?

Maybe I took it a little too personally, but I felt like someone looking at it from a professional standpoint wouldn’t be so quick to disregard me. Traditional publishing works way differently and there’re things like a publishing advance. But as an indie, you don’t get an advance. It’s all earned one penny at a time. And I’m completely fine with that, because I’m in it for the long haul. This isn’t a get rich quick scheme, and I knew that when I started down this path.

And she’ll learn that on her own, or she’ll encourage her boyfriend to go traditional instead. So, now that I’ve ranted a little, I’m going to let it go. We all choose our own path and if he’s really determined to get his stuff published, he’ll figure it out for himself which way is best for him.

Back to the good stuff!

One of my releases scheduled for next year is another nonfiction book for my Brainstorm to Book series; my editing process. And as I did with the first book, I’ll be posting some snippets of it on here. This Thursday will be the first of these posts with a general overview of my editing process. If you’re a writer, I hope you find it helpful. And if you’re only a reader, I hope you enjoy the inside view of the book writing process.

4 thoughts on “A Little Self Brag”

  1. Ugh, I totally understand you!
    Most people seem to think that if you don鈥檛 earn decent money with your book, it must be bad.
    So not true!
    There are so many traditionally published books that are absolutely terrible, but sell well because the publisher has the network to promote their books.

    I am an illustrator myself, but have worked with authors who think their self published book will make them millions. If only, hahah.
    I, too, get discouraged by it, but I am just going to keep on going and one day I might make it 馃挭

    1. The people not in the business hear about those “break out successes” and figure that’s how it will be for everyone, haha. We can always dream about it, but I’d rather put in the work and earn it than cross my fingers and hope Netflix discovers me on its own.
      馃檪

  2. Ugh, I totally understand you!
    Most people seem to think that if you don鈥檛 earn decent money with your book, it must be bad.
    So not true!
    There are so many traditionally published books that are absolutely terrible, but sell well because the publisher has the network to promote their books.

    I am an illustrator myself, but have worked with authors who think their self published book will make them millions. If only, hahah.
    I, too, get discouraged by it, but I am just going to keep on going and one day I might make it 馃挭

    1. The people not in the business hear about those “break out successes” and figure that’s how it will be for everyone, haha. We can always dream about it, but I’d rather put in the work and earn it than cross my fingers and hope Netflix discovers me on its own.
      馃檪

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